Clouds for Comment / Diane Rosenblum - 3/15/2015

Today's post comes from Sara Magaletta. After receiving her BA in Art History from Boston University, Sara moved to Santa Fe to be closer to her family. She is deeply involved in community development and maintains her life long love for art and fashion.
 
Perhaps those of us living in New Mexico are immune. Every evening, when the sun sets, we see a dynamic combination of colors and forms that seem more beautiful than the night before. Visitors will always exclaim, “did you see you see the sunset? Where can we get a good view of the sunset?” For those lucky enough to call Santa Fe their home, we can see it every night.
 

Diane Rosenblum
Untitled [I think there is just too much negative space…]
2010 (printed 2012)
pigment print
29 7/8 x 39 15/16 in.
Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art.
Gift of Foster Goldstrom, 2012 (2012.29.1)
 

Diane Rosenblum’s, “Clouds for Comment” series literally invites viewers to take more time with the photo and create their own opinion. In the spirit of our culture’s seemingly never-ending fascination with social media, Rosenblum originally posted her photos on flicker for guests to view and comment, eventually adding the text to their corresponding images. The result is a curious game of hide and seek. Upon initial glance, her photos appear to be nothing more than an amazing shot of pure sky, but stay a while, and notice the text within. Words sharing the opinion of the aforementioned flickr surfers make these images something to spend time with.

Diane Rosenblum
Untitled [only thing bad i would have to say, is that one cloud in the foreground top left, it was out of your control]
2010 (printed 2012)
pigment print
29 7/8 x 40 in.
Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art.
Gift of Foster Goldstrom, 2012 (2012.29.2)
 

It is exceptionally gutsy that Rosenblum created a live forum for the public to share their opinion, and her courage is only amplified as her pieces incorporate text that is not all flattering. The pieces on display at NMMA use the text, “ I think there is just too much negative space…” and “only thing bad i would have to say, is that one cloud in the foreground top left, it was out of your control.” Rosenblum is not choosing her words to boost her ego, or cause viewers to applaud her. She has chosen words that make the viewer think about someone else’s perspective, thus forcing them to consider their own.

Art can be intimidating and elitist, and people aren’t always willing to share their thoughts about something they see in fear of getting it wrong. Rosenblum forces her audience to feel comfortable with their experience. She has transformed what can be a somewhat indispensable subject, into an innovative conversation piece, without even being in the room.

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